OSUMI Kaoru

Faculty & Position:St.Luke's Birth Clinic  nurse
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Last Updated: May 22, 2019 at 05:04

Researcher Profile & Settings

Qualification

  • 看護学修士

Research Activities

Research Areas

  • Nursing / Lifelong developmental nursing
  • Nursing / Clinical nursing
  • Nursing / Community health/Gerontological nursing
  • Nursing / Fundamental nursing

Research Interests

    , DV

Published Papers

Conference Activities & Talks

  • Capacity Building of Women Volunteer Group in Union of Myanmar: follow up Evaluation in 2005
    Hiromi Eto, Michiko Oguro, Aya Ezawa, Tsuchiya Madoka, Kaoru Oosumi, Shigeko Horiuchi
    4th International Multidesciplinary Conference in collaboration with the Global Network of the WHO Collaborating Centres of Nursing and Midwifery Development. Jun. 2006
  • Capacity Building of Women Volunteer Group in Union of Myanmar: Material and Child Health in the Rural Regions 2003-2004
    Michiko Oguro, Hiromi Eto, Tsuchiya Madoka, Kaoru Oosumi, Shigeko Horiuchi
    4th International Multidesciplinary Conference in collaboration with the Global Network of the WHO Collaborating Centres of Nursing and Midwifery Development. Jun. 2006

Misc

  • Approaches towards the smart use of methods in evidence-based medicine
    MAEDA Naomi, SATO Taiko, OSUMI Kaoru, YAJU Yukari, HORIUCHI Shigeko
    Journal of Japan Academy of Midwifery 18(2) 94-106 Dec. 2004
  • The Physiological and Emotional Responses to the Care for Postpartum Uterine Contraction : The Comparison between Cold Compress Application and Observation Without the Application
    Osumi Kaoru, Horiuchi Shigeko
    Journal of St. Luke's Society of Nursing Research 11(1) 10-18 Jun. 2007
    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of cold compression as the immediate postpartum maternal care. Cold compression is a Japanese traditional method to promote uterine contractions and decrease the amount of hemorrhage. In this study, seventeen participants were provided cold compress on their lower abdomen (Group A), and compared with the fifteen participants who did not receive such treatment (Group B). The participants' physical and emotional responses were compared between the two groups. All of the participants were expecting term delivery without any maternal complications and being admitted to the two midwifery homes. To analyze physical responses, forehead deep temperature (FDT), skin temperature (ST), and the amount of hemorrhage were measured. FDT and ST were recorded every minute for two hours after the delivery using CoreTemp[○!R]CTM-210 (TERUMO Corp). In order to monitor the emotional responses after the postpartum contraction, the subjective pain was measured using VAS scale. The subjective feeling of comfort and the sensation of coldness in the lower abdomen were also measured. The study showed the following results: a) There was no significant differences in deep temperatures between Group A and B, indicating that the application of cold compress did not affect deep temperatures; b) Only Group A had a rapid drop in ST to 22 degrees C in one hour after delivery; c) Eight out of sixteen participants in Group A and one out of fifteen in Group B expressed the coldness on the lower abdomen at one hour after delivery; d) The amount of hemorrhage during the third stage of delivery was significantly higher in Group B, 190(±127)g in Group A and 376(±128)g in Group B [t(23)= - 3.63 p < .05]. However, the amount was not significantly different from A to B during the cold compress application. Further study is needed for other care factors that affected the amount of hemorrhage, e) Group A and B had different VAS score patterns. VAS was constant in Group A from one to two hours after delivery while it was gradually increased in Group B. In conclusion, the results of this study did not support any positive effects of cold compress application. Cold compression is not necessary for the immediate postpartum care if the uterine contraction is within expected range.
  • Process Evaluation for Development of Capacity Building Program for Reproductive and Child Health at the Community Level in Union of Myanmer, Phase II-2005〜2006-
    Tsuchiya Madoka, Oguro Mihciko, Eto Hiromi, Osumi Kaoru, Horiuchi Shigeko
    Journal of St. Luke's Society of Nursing Research 11(1) 83-89 Jun. 2007
    Background: Since September 2003, a Women's health Volunteer Group (WVG) has been established in two villages in Myanmar's central dry zone. The purpose of the group is to improve regional reproductive and child health, and training program has been given to women who fulfilled certain conditions. This human resources training program is divided into Phase I (foundation phase), Phase II (maintenance and continuation phase) and Phase III (independent phase) during the period from September 2003 to March 2008. The WVG is expected to become capable of conducting activities independently in four and a half years. Aim: To grasp the activities maintained and continued by the WVG in Phase II (September 2005-February 2006), in which the WVG received support from external parties, and to clarify the contents of support in Phase III. Method: We conducted focus group interviews with the WVG members who agreed to participate. Interviews were held twice in each of the nutrition centers in two villages, where the WVG is based. The interview details were written down at the time of the interviews, and among them, we analyzed the discourse on WVG activities in Program Phase II. Results: At village A, there were 6 participants at both the first and the second interview. At village B, there were 10 participants at the first interview, and 11 participants at the second interview. Through the interviews, it was clear that WVG activities have been continued, with their focus on first aid and the family planning revolving capital program. The activities of the WVG have been gradually permeating into the villages, and have been supported by the understanding of authority in the villages. Factors thought to be strengthening the activities are the pleasure of satisfying intellectual curiosity and empowerment derived from gratitude from the residents. Factors thought to be weakening activities are lack of confidence and lack of process for obtaining agreement within the Group. Towards Phase III, in which the WVG will aim for independent development of activities, external supporters should carefully evaluate each development stage of the WVG.
  • Process Evaluation for Development of Capacity Building Program for Reproductive and Child Health at the Community Level in Union of Myanmar, PhaseII -2005~2006-
     11(1) 83-89 Jun. 2007
    Background: Since September 2003, a Women's health Volunteer Group (WVG) has been established in two villagesin Myanmar's central dry zone. The purpose of the group is to improve regional reproductive and child health,and training program has been given to women who fulfilled certain conditions. This human resources trainingprogram is divided into Phase I (foundation phase), Phase II (maintenance and continuation phase) and Phase III(independent phase) during the period from September 2003 to March 2008. The WVG is expected to become capableof conducting activities independently in four and a half years.Aim: To grasp the activities maintained and continued by the WVG in Phase II (September 2005-February 2006), inwhich the WVG received support from external parties, and to clarify the contents of support in Phase III.Method: We conducted focus group interviews with the WVG members who agreed to participate. Interviewswere held twice in each of the nutrition centers in two villages, where the WVG is based. The interview detailswere written down at the time of the interviews, and among them, we analyzed the discourse on WVG activities inProgram Phase II.Results: At v


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